Is Your Home Insulated Properly?

Is Your Home Insulated Properly?

When you get out of a warm bed and walk onto the floor-an icy cold floor-the reality that insulation exists is clear. Without a layer of carpet providing some insulation, a wooden or tile floor can feel more like an ice block. check it out

Blankets are used as padding as well, and not only on a pillow. Blanket insulation is one of the isolation forms that are used in home and commercial building. Heating and cooling accounts for around 50 to 70 percent of the electricity consumed in the typical household, which is why the homeowner of today is having a deeper look at the amount and nature of the products used to insulate the house.

Unless a home is built as an Energy Star home (a specially built home with at least 15 percent more energy efficiency than the homes built under the 2004 International Residential Code), it can usually benefit from some extra insulation. Many older homes have much fewer separation than newly constructed houses, however in a few years ‘ time, installing insulation to every newer home will will compensate for itself in energy saving.

So, how do you decide if you want to add insulation? Next, you ought to figure out how well the house actually has insulation. One way to allow this determination is by undertaking an energy audit by a Qualified Energy Auditor. An energy assessment will help identify a home’s problem areas that can use air sealing improvements, an important step that needs to be taken before insulation is added. Insulation checks are also a routine part of the energy audit.

Homeowners would be able to assess levels of insulation by testing the form and strength of the protection currently in operation at different locations. If the home is a newer one, those details should be provided by the builder. You will need to inspect the insulation manually in an older home though.

First remove the cover plates on some electrical outlets or switches in different parts of the house-after first turning off the circuit to check the outer exterior walls. A visual inspection can help to uncover what’s behind the drywall. Another way of checking is by drilling a small hole where it will not be noticed (in a closet against an external wall) and doing a visual inspection.

Make sure to test insulating walls, crawl spaces and basements. If a house is constructed over a crawl space or an unused basement, the insulation will be noticeable from the unused room for the home’s ground floor. It should include the fiberglass batts with a vapor barrier (plastic or paper backing).

You can check whether the foundation is isolated by digging around the basement outside and checking for the rigid foam that may have been applied.

And now you wonder how the extra insulation can be added? Typically the best location to incorporate insulation is in the attic and will have the most electricity savings as well. A simple way of insulating the attic is to peer through the exposed attic board. If the insulation is level with or below the joists in the attic floor, it is a good idea to have more isolation. There are many methods of applying insulation to an attic, including placing fiberglass batts (blankets) or cellulose isolation blowing. The job may be performed by a contractor, or a trusting homeowner might borrow appliances from a home improvement shop.

Make careful to never cover vents in the attic. If applying insulation to an attic, consideration will be taken to insure that the eave or soffit vents manage to provide ventilation to the attic and under the sheathing of the roof. Also, make sure you do not place insulation near any flue pipes or on recessed lighting fixtures or around them. Air clearance around light fixtures and flue pipes should be of at least 3 inches. Insulation of the blanket or roll type often has a vapor retardant attached to it which has to be in the correct orientation. Tell manufacturers what’s true